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Date:
June 15, 2020
Time:
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Location:
Webinar
Address:
Menlo Park, CA 94025
Email:
Cost:
Free
Artist Ruth Asawa peering through her wire sculpture
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Everything She Touched: The Life of Ruth Asawa

Monday, June 15, 2020

WWII prison camp survivor Ruth Asawa broke race and gender barriers to become an artist of genius. Marilyn Chase shares her look into Asawa’s life and art.

Author Marilyn Chase joins us to discuss her book, Everything She Touched: the Life of Ruth Asawa. This biography recounts the incredible life of the American sculptor (1926–2013), a woman who wielded imagination and hope in the face of intolerance and who transformed everything she touched into art. 

About Marilyn Chase
Marilyn Chase is a journalist, author, and teacher. She spent over two decades at the Wall Street Journal, and her previous books include The Barbary Plague: The Black Death in Victorian San Francisco. As a continuing lecturer at U.C. Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism, Chase now teaches reporting and writing to a new generation of journalists. She lives in San Francisco.

About Ruth Asawa
Ruth Asawa was born and raised on a California farm. She survived the World War II-era Japanese internment camps, which is where she got her first art lessons—from three Japanese-American animators who had worked for Walt Disney and were interned along with her. As an adult, Asawa developed a style of hanging wire sculptures that is celebrated all over the world. With her sinuous, intricate, and seemingly weightless metal sculptures, Asawa transformed the barbed wire of her adolescence into art that is both extraordinarily beautiful and entirely unique. Ruth Asawa's fountains are now San Francisco icons, and her signature hanging-wire sculptures grace the MoMA, de Young, Getty, Whitney, and many more museums and galleries across the country.